Web Designer: Cover Letter Writing Guide & Template

Updated: Jul 2

You have finally finished writing your resume. You're now sure that you now have a perfect resume for the web designer position.


Your resume demonstrates all the skills an expert web designer should have, such as the ability to independently execute all the stages of the website design process, the knowledge of how to use the best design practices to ensure positive user experience, as well as strong communication skills, creativity, and excellent technical skills.


You can’t wait to submit your next job application.


But wait for a second - before you do so, there is one more thing you need to do.


For a perfect job application, your resume needs an equally impressive cover letter.


Let us help. Here you are going to learn:


how to write a perfect web designer cover letter that actually gets read by employers

how to format a cover letter to stand out among the rest

what to do before you send your cover letter


Finally, you’ll get a word-for-word web designer cover letter template. Just replace the keywords, and your cover letter will be ready in no time.

>> Download a resume pack for your next job application. Cover letter template included! <<



How to Write a Perfect Cover Letter?


A cover letter should complement the content of your resume.


In 300 to 250 words, you should put your skills and experience in the context of the job you're applying for to convince the employer that you are the best candidate for the open position.


Considering the limited space, don't merely copy the content of your resume to your cover letter.


Instead, use this space to:

  • build your brand and position yourself as an expert in the field

  • express things that cannot be added to a resume, such as your motivation for the application, the story behind your most impressive achievements or the reasons why you want to work for this company.


A cover letter allows you to build your brand, position yourself as an expert, add value to your application and express things that cannot be added to a resume, such as your motivation for applying, the story behind your most impressive achievements or the reasons why you want to work for this company.

To do so, here is the proven structure you should follow:



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1. Greeting


Start with a greeting.


It may look like a minor detail, but this part sets the tone of your cover letter. Hence, it can easily be a deal-breaker. Make sure you do it right.


  • Greetings to avoid: Do not use obsolete, unnatural and over-used greetings such as ‘To Whom It May Concern’ or ‘Dear Sir or Madam’. Some hiring managers immediately stop reading a cover letter if they see one of those two phrases, so avoid them.

  • Address personally: Address your letter to the hiring manager directly. If no name is listed with the posting, use LinkedIn to find out the department director, recruiter, or other contact associated with the position.

  • Or: If you can't find a name, start the letter with ‘Dear Hiring Manager’ or ‘Dear XYZ Team’. (Insert the department you'd work at instead of the XYZ.)

  • But don’t: Don’t combine too many options starting your cover letter with ‘Dear Sir/Madam/Hiring Manager/Mister/Miss’. It makes you look unconfident and indecisive.


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